Pregabalin

 
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Form.

Capsules: 25 milligrams,
Capsules: 50 milligrams,
Capsules: 75 milligrams,
Capsules: 100 milligrams,
Capsules: 150 milligrams,
Capsules: 200 milligrams,
Capsules: 225 milligrams,
Capsules: 300 milligrams.

Without a Script

Pregabalin is prescribed for neuropathic pain associated with:
- Postherpetic neuralgia;
- In combination with other drugs to treat partial onset seizures in adults;
- Diabetic peripheral neuropathy;

Pregabalin is prescribed for treating fibromyalgia.

Dosage.

Pregabalin may be administered with or without food. The initial dose for neuropathic pain is 50 milligrams three times a day (150 milligrams/d). The dose may be increased to a maximum dose of 100 milligrams 3 times daily (300 milligrams/d) after one week.

The recommended starting dose for postherpetic neuralgia is 75 milligrams twice daily or 50 milligrams three times daily. The dose may be increased to 100 milligrams 3 times daily (300 milligrams/d) after one week. If pain relief is inadequate after 2-4 weeks of treatment at 300 milligrams/d, the dose may be increased to 300 milligrams twice daily or 200 milligrams three times daily. Doses greater than 300 milligrams cause more side effects.

The recommended dose for treating seizures is 150-600 milligrams/d divided into 2 or 3 doses.

Side Effects.

The most common side effects of Pregabalin are:
- Blurred vision;
- Difficulty concentrating;
- Dizziness;
- Drowsiness;
- Dry mouth;
- Edema (accumulation of fluid);
- Weight gain;

Other side effects include:
- Increased blood creatinine kinase levels;
- Peripheral edema;
- Reduced blood platelet counts;

Increased creatinine kinase could be a sign of muscle injury, and in clinical trials three patients experienced rhabdomyolysis (severe muscle injury).

Therefore, patients should report unexplained muscle pain, tenderness or weakness to their doctors, especially if associated with fever and malaise (reduced well-being).
Without Prescription (2017)