Liothyronine

 
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Contraindications

Liothyronine is contraindicated if you have any of the following conditions:
- an unusual or allergic reaction to liothyronine, thyroid hormones, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives;
- angina;
- breast-feeding;
- diabetes;
- dieting or on a weight loss program;
- fertility problems;
- heart disease;
- high levels of thyroid hormone;
- pituitary gland problem;
- pregnant or trying to get pregnant;
- previous heart attack;

Without a Prescription

Liothyronine can improve symptoms of thyroid deficiency such as slow speech, lack of energy, weight gain, hair loss, dry skin, and feeling cold.
Liothyronine helps to treat goiter (an enlarged thyroid gland).
Liothyronine is a thyroid hormone.
Liothyronine is indicared to treat hypothyroidism (low production of thyroid hormone) in adults and children.
Liothyronine is prescribed in a test of the thyroid gland to determine if the thyroid is functioning normally.
Prolonged hypothyroidism can result in a condition called myxedema in which patients develop swollen lips, thickened nose, and unusual deposits of material in the skin that are dry and waxy.
These deposits also may appear in body tissues other than the skin.

Interactions

Do not take Liothyronine with any of the following drugs:
- amiodarone;
- antacids;
- anti-thyroid medicines;
- calcium supplements;
- carbamazepine;
- cholestyramine;
- colestipol;
- digoxin;
- female hormones, including contraceptive or birth control pills;
- iron supplements;
- ketamine;
- liquid nutrition products like ensure;
- medicines for colds and breathing difficulties;
- medicines for diabetes;
- medicines for mental depression;
- medicines or herbals used to decrease weight or appetite;
- phenobarbital or other barbiturate medications;
- phenytoin;
- prednisone or other corticosteroids;
- rifabutin;
- rifampin;
- soy isoflavones;
- sucralfate;
- theophylline;
- warfarin;
- cholestyramine (questran);
- colestipol (colestid);
- digoxin (lanoxin);
- warfarin (coumadin);

Side Effects

Liothyronine side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:
- changes in appetite;
- changes in menstrual periods;
- chest pain;
- diarrhea;
- difficulty breathing, wheezing, or shortness of breath;
- excessive sweating or intolerance to heat;
- fast or irregular heartbeat;
- hair loss;
- headache;
- nausea, vomiting;
- nervousness;
- skin rash or hives;
- swelling of ankles, feet, or legs;
- tiredness;
- tremors;
- trouble sleeping;
- weight loss;
- cardiac arrest;
- chest pain;
- diarrhea;
- excessive sweating;
- fever;
- headache;
- heat intolerance;
- increased heart rate;
- insomnia;
- nervousness;
- tremor;
- vomiting;
- weight loss;

Form

Tablets: 5, 25, 50 mcg. Injection: 10 mcg/ml

Dosage

Optimal liothyronine doses are different for each patient and vary depending on the patient's age, weight, symptoms, blood levels of thyroid hormone and underlying conditions such as heart disease. Individuals who are hypothyroid will require thyroid hormone for life.
The dose then is adjusted based on the patient's response and the blood levels of thyroid hormone.
The usual starting dose of liothyronine is 5 to 25 mcg per day.
Without Prescription (2017)