Glibenclamide

 
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Without a Prescription

Glibenclamide is prescribed as an adjunct to diet to lower the blood glucose in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (Type II) whose hyperglycemia cannot be satisfactorily controlled by diet alone.
Glibenclamide works by increasing the amount of insulin that the pancreas secretes.
If the body does not make enough insulin to meet its needs, or does not properly use the insulin it makes, this results in the condition called diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes).
Insulin is made naturally in the pancreas. It regulates the amount of sugar in the blood.

Contraindications

Glibenclamide is contraindicated if you have any of the following conditions:
- If you suffer from porphyria (a blood disorder);
- If you suffer from kidney or liver problems;
- If you have ever had an allergic reaction to this or any other medicine;
- If you are taking other medicines, including those available to buy without a prescription, herbal or complementary medicines;
- If you are pregnant, trying for a baby or breast-feeding;
- If you are elderly;

Interactions

Do not take Glibenclamide with any of the following drugs:

The beta-blocker decreases the symptoms of hypoglycemia:
- Timolol;
- Sotalol;
- Propranolol;
- Practolol;
- Pindolol;
- Penbutolol;
- Oxprenolol;
- Nadolol;
- Metoprolol;
- Labetalol;
- Esmolol;
- Carvedilol;
- Carteolol;
- Bisoprolol;
- Bevantolol;
- Betaxolol;
- Atenolol;
- Acebutolol;

The agent increases the effect of sulfonylurea:
- Chloramphenicol;
- Clofibrate;
- Dicumarol;

The salicylate increases the effect of sulfonylurea:
- Aspirin;
- BismuthSubsalicylate;
- Salicylate-magnesium;
- Salicylate-sodium;
- Salsalate;
- Trisalicylate-choline;

The MAO inhibitor increases the effect of the hypoglycemic agent:
- Tranylcypromine;
- Phenelzine;
- Isocarboxazid;

Side Effects

Glibenclamide side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:
- Blurred vision (particularly at the start of treatment);
- Constipation;
- Diarrhoea;
- Faintness or drowsiness (signs of low blood sugar);
- Feeling or being sick;
- Fever;
- Headache;
- Increased weight;
- Itchy skin rash;
- Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes);
- Paleness;
- Sweating;
- Unexplained bruising;

Other Brand Names

In some countries Glibenclamide may also be known as:
- Gluco-Tablimen;
- Glucomid;
- Glucolon;
- Glucohexal;
- Glucobene;
- Gluben;
- Glubate;
- Glitisol;
- Glisulin;
- Glimidstata;
- Glimide;
- Glimel;
- Glidiabet;
- Glicem;
- Gliboral;
- Glibil;
- Glibetic;
- Glibet;
- Glibesyn;
- Glibenclamide-Puren N;
- Gliban;
- Glibadone;
- Glamide;
- Gilemal;
- Gewaglucon;
- Gen-Glybe;
- GBN 5;
- Euglykon;
- Euglucon;
- Euglucon 5;
- Euglucan;
- Euclamin;
- Duraglucon;
- Dibelet;
- Diabiphage;
- Diabeta;
- Dia-basan;
- Debtan;
- Daonil;
- Cytagon;
- Calabren;
- Betanese 5;
- Betanase;
- Benclamin;
- Bastiverit;
- Azuglucon;
- Adiab;
- Abbenclamide;
Without Prescription (2017)