Erythromycin

 
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Without a Prescription

Erythromycin is an antibiotic prescribed to treat many kinds of infections, including:
- Whooping cough;
- Urinary tract infections;
- Upper and lower respiratory tract infections;
- Syphilis;
- Skin infections;
- Reproductive tract infections;
- Rectal infections;
- Pinkeye;
- Listeriosis;
- Legionnaires' disease;
- Intestinal parasitic infections;
- Gonorrhea;
- Acute pelvic inflammatory disease;

Erythromycin is prescribed to prevent rheumatic fever in people who are allergic to penicillin and sulfa drugs.
Erythromycin, like any other antibiotic, works best when there is a constant amount of drug in the blood. To help keep the drug amount constant, it is important not to miss any doses.
It is advisable to take the doses at evenly spaced times around the clock.
It is prescribed before colorectal surgery to prevent infection.

Side Effects

Erythromycin side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:

More common side effects may include:
- Vomiting;
- Nausea;
- Loss of appetite;
- Diarrhea;
- Abdominal pain;

Less common side effects may include:
- Yellow eyes and skin;
- Skin eruptions;
- Rash;
- Hives;

Rare side effects may include:
- Skin reddening;
- Severe blisters in the mouth and eyes;
- Severe allergic reaction;
- Irregular heartbeat;
- Inflammation of the large intestine;
- Hearing loss (temporary);

Contraindications

Erythromycin is contraindicated if you have any of the following conditions:
- If a new infection (called superinfection) develops;
- If you develop diarrhea;
- If you have ever had an allergic reaction to it or are sensitive to it;
- If you have ever had liver disease;
- If you have myasthenia gravis (muscle weakness), it can be aggravated by Erythromycin;

Interactions

Do not take Erythromycin with any of the following drugs:
- Theophylline (theo-dur);
- Tacrolimus (prograf);
- Seizure medications such as depakene, depakote, and dilantin;
- Hexobarbital;
- Ergotamine (cafergot);
- Disopyramide (norpace);
- Dihydroergotamine (d.h.e. 45);
- Digoxin (lanoxin);
- Cyclosporine (sandimmune, neoral);
- Carbamazepine (tegretol);
- Bromocriptine (parlodel);
- Blood-thinning drugs such as coumadin;
- Benzodiazepines such as halcion and versed;

Dosage

CHILDREN

Age, weight, and severity of the infection determine the correct dosage.

The usual dosage is from 30 to 50 milligrams daily for each 2.2 pounds of body weight, divided into equal doses for 10 to 14 days. For pneumonia in infants due to chlamydia, treatment lasts at least 3 weeks.

For more severe infections, this dosage may be doubled, but it should not exceed 4 grams per day.

Children weighing over 44 pounds should follow the recommended adult dose schedule.

For prevention of bacterial endocarditis, the children's dosage is 10 milligrams per 2.2 pounds of body weight 2 hours before dental work or surgery, followed by 5 milligrams per 2.2 pounds 6 hours later.

ADULTS

Urinary Tract Infections Due to Chlamydia Trachomatis During Pregnancy

The usual dosage is 500 milligrams of Erythromycin orally 4 times a day or 666 milligrams every 8 hours on an empty stomach for at least 7 days. For women who cannot tolerate this regimen, a decreased dose of 500 milligrams every 12 hours or 333 milligrams every 8 hours a day should be prescribed for at least 14 days.

Streptococcal Infections

The usual dose is 333 milligrams every 8 hours, or 500 milligrams every 12 hours. Depending on the severity of the infection, the dose may be increased to a total of 4 grams a day. However, when the daily dosage is larger than 1 gram, twice-a-day doses are not recommended, and the drug should be taken more often in smaller doses.

To prevent repeated infections in people who have had rheumatic fever, the usual dosage is 250 milligrams twice a day.

To treat streptococcal infections of the upper respiratory tract (tonsillitis or strep throat), Erythromycin should be taken for at least 10 days.

For Those with Nongonococcal Urethral Infections When Tetracycline Cannot Be Taken

The usual dosage is 500 milligrams of Erythromycin by mouth 4 times a day or 666 milligrams orally every 8 hours for at least 7 days.

For Those with Uncomplicated Urinary, Reproductive Tract, or Rectal Infections Caused by Chlamydia Trachomatis When Tetracycline Cannot Be Taken

The usual oral dosage is 500 milligrams of Erythromycin 4 times a day or 666 milligrams every 8 hours for at least 7 days.

Acute Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Caused by Neisseria Gonorrhoeae

The usual treatment is three days of intravenous Erythromycin followed by 500 milligrams orally every 12 hours or 333 milligrams orally every 8 hours for 7 days.

Intestinal Infections

The usual dosage is 500 milligrams every 12 hours, or 333 milligrams every 8 hours, for 10 to 14 days.

Syphilis

The usual dosage is 30 to 40 grams divided into smaller doses over a period of 10 to 15 days.

Legionnaires' Disease

The usual dosage ranges from 1 to 4 grams daily, divided into smaller doses.

Overdose

Symptoms of Erythromycin overdose may include:
- Vomiting;
- Stomach cramps;
- Nausea;
- Diarrhea;
Without Prescription (2017)