Alclometasone

 
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Without a Prescription

Alclometasone, a synthetic steroid medication of the cortisone family, is spread on the skin to relieve certain types of itchy rashes, including psoriasis.
To keep this problem to a minimum, avoid using large amounts of Alclometasone over large areas, and do not cover it with airtight dressings such as plastic wrap or adhesive bandages unless specifically told to by your doctor.
Too much absorption can lead to unwanted side effects elsewhere in the body.
When you use Alclometasone, you inevitably absorb some of the medication through your skin and into the bloodstream.

Side Effects

Alclometasone side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:

Side effects may include:
- Stretch marks on skin;
- Redness;
- Rash;
- Prickly heat;
- Pale spots;
- Itching;
- Irritation;
- Infection;
- Dryness;
- Burning;
- Allergic rash/inflammation;
- Acne-like pimples;

Contraindications

Alclometasone is contraindicated if you have any of the following conditions:
- If it has ever given you an allergic reaction;
- If your skin is inflamed or you have some other skin condition;
- If you use Alclometasone over large areas of skin for prolonged periods of time, the amount of hormone absorbed into your bloodstream may eventually lead to cushing's syndrome: a moon-faced appearance, fattened neck and trunk, and purplish streaks on the skin;

Interactions

Do not take Alclometasone with any of the following drugs:
Check with your doctor before combining Alclometasone with other more potent steroids, since this could lead to undesirably large amounts of hormone circulating in your bloodstream.

Dosage

Bandages that block out air may be prescribed to control psoriasis and other severe skin rashes, if your doctor recommends them.
Apply a thin film of Alclometasone cream or ointment to the affected skin areas 2 or 3 times daily; massage gently until the medication disappears.

Apply as follows:
- Cover the affected area with a thick layer of Alclometasone cream or ointment and a light gauze dressing, then cover the area with a pliable plastic film.
- Leave the dressing in place 1 to 4 days and repeat the procedure 3 or 4 times as needed.
- Seal the edges to the normal skin by adhesive tape or other means.

If you don't see any improvement within 2 weeks, check with your doctor.
Once your condition is under control, you should stop using Alclometasone.
With this method of treatment, marked improvement is often seen in a few days.
Your doctor will recommend an alternative treatment.
If an infection develops, the use of airtight bandages should be discontinued.

Overdose

Any medication taken in excess can have serious consequences.
If this happens, see a doctor without delay.
If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately.
In a child, an overdose of Alclometasone may cause increased pressure within the skull leading to bulging soft spots (in an infant's head) or headache.
Over the long term, overuse of Alclometasone can interfere with a child's normal growth and development.
Without Prescription (2017)